As you know, the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has now spread to every continent. Watching a video clip of people in Wuhan where the epidemic vented, shouting “Wuhan fighting” together through my window, I was startled.

In a certain aspect, besides the drastic prevention measures of experts, the preparation of mothers and wives in the purchase of food, medical supplies to protect family health, encouraging each other to keep the optimistic hope is also a way for people to fight this terrible pandemic.

This story reminds me of a famous literary work of O. Henry. In the story “The Last Leaf”, Johnsy has severe pneumonia and is desperately counting the ivy leaves outside the sickroom window of hospital fell day by day. She had a belief that when the last leaf left the branch, she was going to die.

Then, after a stormy night, the last leaf on the tree was still there. This event caused Johnsy to change awareness, agree to eat and continue treatment. Unexpectedly, that leaf was the “masterpiece” of an old painter who drew on the wall on the night when the last leaf fell to help Johnsy maintain her spirits.

Indeed, hope plays a very important role in the treatment of diseases, fighting against natural disasters and epidemics. In addition to hygiene measures, disease prevention, good mental care is also a necessity.

Many scientific studies have shown that chronic stress can adversely affect the components of the body’s immune system. Therefore, keeping the psychology stable, optimistic and avoiding stresses, anxiety can also be considered as a positive factor in the prevention of COVID-19 today.

Even when the medicine is not able to make patients overcome the critical condition, doctors and families can continue to cultivate hope by helping patients have their final days gently, meaningfully. Finally, when loved ones die, the hope that they will go to heaven, no longer suffering torment is a great comfort for those who stay.

With the number of people infected and dying from the COVID-19 still increasing day by day, we still see images of health workers directly fighting against epidemics with the imprints of protective gear and gloves. They are the ones who are drastically day and night in the battle of survival.

Surely, physician themselves have parents, spouses, and children. They also have concerns about their own health and that of their family. But they still choose to stay at the hospital and fight against disease as the hope of the world. Now their work is not only a responsibility but also the honor of a physician.

Recently, news of the death of the young Dr. Li Wenliang in Wuhan touched many people. He was the one who courageously warned the public about the spread of the virus despite the risk of arrest.

Besides, we can see many individuals and organizations offer free face masks, foods, or useful tips about handwashing dispensing to prevent Coronavirus. It is the hope of a kind, supportive society that helps each other in times of need.

Interspersed with sad, anxious news are stories of joy and hope. As the philosopher, Nietzsche once said: “Those who have a reason to live can exist in all adversities.” The song “Fight the virus” written by Alvin Oon ends with a strong message: “Humanity, we will win this fight the virus”.

To sum up, no one knows for sure when the illness will go away, but we still have great hope for a good future ahead.

 

 

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Jackie Keibler Jackie

My name is Jackie Keibler. With many years of experience as a content manager and a blogger, I love to express my opinions in aspects of life, particularly self-improvement. I also love to share all my knowledge and experience with those who have experienced profound loss to help them deal with loss. As a writer, I have read many useful articles about hope, belief, loss, and even pain. I gain useful experience from everyone all around the world. I understand it’s difficult to overcome all, but if we have hope, we can improve our lives. Currently, I am also working at Couponxoo.com (https://www.couponxoo.com/).

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